Majority Of French Want The Right To Vote To Stay In European Union

A young Gérard Depardieu during his days as a model for the French franc.

The University of Edinburgh has conducted a study on Britain’s upcoming referendum to leave the European Union, and not only did majority of French respondents want Britain to remain in the EU—they also want their own referendum.

The study, conducted in a part of the United Kingdom well-known for referendums on leaving unions, polled just over 8,000 people in France, Germany, Spain, Ireland, Poland, and Sweden on how they viewed Britain’s upcoming decision on a “Brexit.”

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France was solidly in favor of their Chunnel buddies staying in the EU, with 56% saying they’d rather the UK stayed, and 44% wishing they’d stop pretending they’re actually attached to the continent. The poll did not account for or discuss the Breakup Metric, in which one half of a crumbling relationship plays up the desire to keep the other around because they know it will A) not keep them from leaving (hopefully), and B) make them look like the good guy.

According to the survey, only France and Sweden believed that the UK’s economy would fare better if it separated itself from the EU. The British pound has remained strong even as the euro has descended towards parity with the U.S. dollar. Among the nations who believe Britain will do worse if it leaves the European Union, polling was the strongest in favor of the country remaining a part of the EU, naturally.

More respondents in Sweden, Germany, and Spain were in favor of holding their own national referendum on EU membership than were against the idea, but in France, 53% of those surveyed wanted their own referendum, although 44% responded that they’d be in favor of staying and only 33% would vote to leave the union. In France, it’s not so much about changing anything as it is having your voice heard.